Survey Photographs

This series of photographs was taken during the 1965 airborne magnetic survey of the Nordic countries and the Greenland Sea. This 1965 survey was the first carried out with the redesigned 3-component airborne magnetometer. Also, for the first time, a proton precession magnetometer was installed in a "stinger" at the rear of the aircraft.

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DC6 aircraft used during the 1965 survey.


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The "stinger" containing the proton precession magnetometer mounted at the rear of the aircraft.


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Weldy Hannaford adjusting the fluxgate sensor and gyro-stabilized platform assembly.


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Weldy Hannaford using a servo-stabilized periscopic sextant to take observations of the sun or stars. These were taken approximately every 30 minutes to determine the position of the aircraft and the heading of the directional gyro with respect to true north.


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George Carr operating the Decca navigation system (top of rack) and the Doppler radar system (Bottom).


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George Carr (left) and a technician from CDC (the manufacturer of the instrument) installing a Doppler radar unit in the DC6. The Doppler unit gave the ground speed and drift angle of the aircraft.


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Paul Serson (seated) and Frede Andersen installing the Precision Instrument digital tape recorder, which recorded average values every five minutes.


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Doug Trigg installing the magnetometer electronics.


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Frede Andersen at the control console for the fluxgate and proton precession magnetometers. Frede Andersen at the control console for the fluxgate and proton precession magnetometers.


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Paul Serson at the control console for the gyro-stabilized platform.


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With each magnetic, survey changes to the equipment were made. This photograph shows Frede Andersen at the control console during the 1974 airborne magnetometer survey. By then, a computer had been added to the control system.